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Contribute:
Do your child's school grade and interest match?
What are your experiences, and do you have any tips for how other parents should relay to children's school interest?
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Posting closes after 10 comments.
Jun 11 2003, Bernhard McCoyle, Brunzee Heights
I find this really controversial, and I don't think it's the 60's anymore. My daughter is not very interested in school but she still manage to keep an A- which makes both herself and us proud. Why should we tell her to study less?


 
 
 
 

 

Children and school
September xx, 2003 - by Cassie Moulino, 
Parents representative at Simmerville Hood Counvcil

What would we sims have been if it wasn't for caring parents - and the teachers? SimCity has one of the best school systems around, and I'm asking local hood councils to focus more on children and education!

A recent research by Sims Science reveiled that school is not a top interests among children. What a surprise! Well, actually not, because very few children are more interested in school work than more fun activities with their friends. 

Only 8% of the children are interested in their studies, in comparation 28% are interested in pets. Most children do pretty well in school though, as 74% said they hold an A grade. This shows that most children do study harder than their interest indicates.

As a specialist with babies, and to some extend also children, I think both the children and their parents would benefit from a community where a child's interest and school grade is matching. A child with absolutely no interest in school should be encouraged to do well, but do not push the child too hard! A little give and take is what I would suggest; if you could accept the child to present a little lower grade, the child could focus a little harder to put more interest in the school work. This is where the secret rests; the interest and not the grade!

Accepting that your son or daughter is not the brightest child in school might be difficult to many parents, but it is actually harder for a child with low school interest to reach the top grade! As a parent you should be able to see that the truth might be a compromize somewhere in between.

Exciting new focus on education
In Simmerville we will have our focus on education all October. A letter has been sent by the Hood Council to all parents, asking them to pay more interest to their child's interest in school and accepting the grade to drop to a level matching the interest.

This might sound like a strange strategy and I do not mean to say this will be the best thing to do always. Each child is different, and if a child with a low interest is willing to study hard, then parents shouldn't stop that process.

Choose the right school
Most sim children go to the school that is located closest to home. This is all fine, but you should be aware that there are different schools, and that a child's interest in school might increase if switching school. There might of course be different reasons for this. Some schools are more expensive in various ways, but remember that what you pay might not mean anything to your child's interest.
city college
Keep in mind that a child needs friends also in school. Check with your neighbours if any of those children might be a good mate to your child. 

What if the interest is very low?

Yes, that is a problem, because some children are hardly interested in school at all, and if you should let their school grade match their interest, they could easily be in line for Military School.

I have made a system to decide what grade is natural to each child. If you say the interest goes from 0 to 10, then the 3 top scores represent As, the 3 next represent Bs, then the next 3 will represent Cs, and 0 or 1 interest point in school would qualify to D+ and D. This would mean that 2% of SimCity children would be having a D, and just one day off from school would be having a dramatical effect on your entire family.